Saturday, January 24, 2015

Le Cercle Sportif Français, Shanghai

Le Cercle Sportif Français, Shanghai

In 1922 Alexandre Léonard and Paul Veysseyre, working freelance for the Shanghai firm of Ledreux, Minutti & Cie, designed a new building for the Cercle Sportif Français (CSF). Rather than continue their freelance arrangement the two young French architects decided to form their own company, A Léonard & P Veysseyre à Shanghai. Ledreux & Minutti took legal action to retain the CSF drawings but ultimately Léonard & Veysseyre were declared the rightful owners of the project design. Construction began in December 1923 continuing through to 1926.

Le Cercle Sportif Français, Shanghai

The club wound up its membership in 1955 when it was clear that there was no place for such an institution in Mao Zedong's China. In any case private ownership of property had been made illegal the previous year and shortly after the CSF closed its accounts the building was taken over by the authorities.

Le Cercle Sportif Français, Shanghai

It's not known how the CSF survived the worst of the Cultural Revolution but somehow it did and today the clubhouse forms part of the Okura Garden Hotel. While many areas of the old CSF have been altered and found new uses within the hotel, the magnificent oval-shaped ballroom is virtually unchanged.

Le Cercle Sportif Français, Shanghai

Undoubtedly the most striking feature of the space is the enormous multi-coloured light but there are many other deco features around the room.

Le Cercle Sportif Français, Shanghai

The 1st floor landing, just outside the ballroom, also boasts a wealth of deco features including nude female figures and geometric patterns on the columns.

Le Cercle Sportif Français, Shanghai

Reference:
Shanghai's Art Deco Master: Paul Veysseyre's Architecture in the French Concession by Spencer Dodington & Charles Lagrange

Sunday, January 18, 2015

Water Tank, Catonsville

Water Tank, Catonsville

I've heard that this structure is not actually a water tank. It is probably more accurately referred to as a reservoir but to my uneducated eyes it looks like a water tank so that's what I've called it. To my mind a reservoir is an open body of water, at least that's what I picture in Australia, but I can also see that an enclosed container such as this can also be a reservoir but frankly, who care! For a purely functional structure it's got some nice decoration.

Water Tank, Catonsville

As you can see from the wording above the door it was built in 1937 for the City of Baltimore Bureau of Water Supply.

Water Tank, Catonsville

There is a lovely band of chevrons running around the top of the wall just below the domed roof and the regularly spaced concrete ribs are topped with ziggurat style decoration.

Water Tank, Catonsville

Saturday, January 17, 2015

Public Service Building, Boston

Batterymarch Building, Boston

Now a Hilton hotel, this tripartite building at 54-68 Batterymarch, Boston was the Public Service Building also known as the Batterymarch Building.

Batterymarch Building, Boston

The 14 storey skyscraper was designed in 1928 by Harold Field Kellogg.

Batterymarch Building, Boston
Batterymarch Building, Boston

Reference:
Art Deco Society of Boston website

Monday, January 12, 2015

A House in Morwell

House, Morwell

Great looking house in Morwell, except for those doors.

Sunday, January 11, 2015

San Souci, Devonport

San Souci, Devonport

I presume the garage is later than the house but they've match it well. Maybe they were both built at the same time and maybe it was yesterday. Maybe someone out there knows.

San Souci, Devonport

Saturday, January 10, 2015

Watson Memorial, Devonport

Watson Memorial, Devonport
Watson memorial
in grateful remembrance
of
Alexander Richardson Dickey Watson
who was born at North Head Devonport
and spent the early years of his
life in this district and whose generous
bequest enabled the seawall
along this foreshore to be erected.

March 1936

Watson Memorial, Devonport